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Honors Seminars
Honors faculty leading a seminar discussion

2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011

HONORS SEMINARS - spring 2017

Investigating Future Patient Profiles
Dr. Janette Hill,
College of Education
Dr. Sylvia Hutchinson, Division of Academic Enhancement
CRN: 41505
Mondays, 1:25-2:15 p.m.
Location TBD

This seminar will provide opportunities for pre-med students to investigate social and demographic issues that they believe may be a part of medical practice in the future. The seminar participants will use medical case problems, selected books and readings, and current news articles to project and examine social issues they believe they will meet in the practice of medicine. Issues will be generated from discussions with local physicians; then the seminar students will prioritize the issues they believe merit investigation.

Jihad: In Medieval and Contemporary Islam
Dr. Kenneth Honerkamp
Religion
CRN: 41881
Wednesdays, 1:25-2:15 p.m.
Moore College 202

Jihad in Medieval and Contemporary Islam has a twofold purpose: The first is to provide the student with essential material needed by anyone involved in research in the Islamic world, including a concise introduction to the sacred text of Islam, the Quran and an overview of the life of Muhammad and his heritage. The second is to open a window for the student upon the Jihad in Islam as perceived by Muslims themselves with an aim toward increasing our understanding of the ongoing debate that this term and/or practice currently entails. It is also hoped that the view through the “window of the Muslim world view” will also provide the student a window from which to view the contemporary political issues of the Muslim world in general and the Middle East in particular. This course also aims at introducing the student to some of the basic scholarly resources for doing research in topics that relate to the Muslim world. In our world today, the need often arises for a student to do research in an areas related to the Muslim world; after leaving this course the student should have a good idea of what resources we have available at UGA for this kind of research.

HONORS SEMINARS - spring 2016

Historic Burial Grounds of North Campus
Professor Scott Nesbit
College of Environment and Design
CRN: 38342
Mondays 10:10-11:00
Moore College 102

The dead tell stories about the living—this class will attempt to listen in. This one-hour course will investigate what we can know about the cultures of this place by studying the historic burial grounds on and around North Campus, particularly Oconee Hill Cemetery and the Old Athens Cemetery.  It will range across disciplines, from anthropology and history to landscape design and historic preservation to grapple with the implications of living around spaces devoted to those who are not.

Jihad: In Medieval and Contemporary Islam
Dr. Kenneth Honerkamp
Religion
CRN: 38443
Wednesdays,  1:25-2:15
Moore College 309

Jihad in Mediaeval and Contemporary Islam has a twofold purpose. The first is to provide the student with essential material needed by anyone involved in research in the Islamic World; including a concise introduction to the sacred text of Islam, the Quran and an overview of the life of Muhammad and his heritage. The second goal is to open a window for the student upon the Jihad in Islam as perceived by Muslims themselves with an aim towards increasing our understanding of the ongoing debate that this term and or practice currently entails. It is also hoped that the view through the “window of the Muslim world view” will also provide the student a window from which to view the contemporary political issues of the Muslim World in general and the Middle East in particular. This course also aims at introducing the student to some of the basic scholarly resources for doing research in topics that relate to the Muslim world. In our world today the need often arises for a student to do research in an areas related to the Muslim world, after leaving this course the student should have a good idea of what resources we have available at UGA for this kind of research.

Appreciation of East-Asian Painting, Prints, Calligraphy, and Other Works of Art
Dr. Stuart Katz
Psychology (Emeritas)
CRN: 36031
Tuesdays, 9:30-10:45
Moore College 102

An introduction to Japanese, Chinese and Korean art, from 14th century to the present, with emphasis on painting, woodblock prints and calligraphy, but also including ceramics and sculpture. Actual works of art from the instructor’s own collection will be shown, including landscapes, bird/animal/flower painting, genre painting, portraiture, calligraphy and Buddhist art. The works of art, like the course, span eight centuries, including the Muromachi, Momoyama, Edo (Japan), Ming, Qing (China), Joseon (Korea) and modern periods. The art will be shown in East Asian formats:  hanging scrolls, hand scrolls, fans, albums, screens, plaques. Digital images from various databases will also be used to provide background on individual artists and art periods. Various aspects of connoisseurship will be discussed including authenticity, conservation, and the basics of collecting art.

Investigating Future Patient Profiles
Dr. Sylvia Hutchinson
Professor Emerita, College of Education
CRN: 36851    
Mondays,  1:25-2:25

CTL Conference Room, Instructional Plaza North

This seminar will provide opportunities for pre-med students to investigate social and demographic issues which they believe may be a part of medical practice in the future. The seminar participants will use medical case problems, selected books and readings, and current news articles to project and examine social issues which they believe they will meet in the practice of medicine. Issues will be generated from discussions with local physicians and then the seminar students will prioritize the issues they believe merit investigation.

Critical Thinking and Moral Issues
Dr. Frank Harrison
Philosophy
CRN: 37015
Wednesdays, 12:20-1:10pm
Peabody 0105

During the first part of this seminar, we will discuss the nature of objective criteria in thinking critically in logic and the sciences. We will then broaden our discussion to examine how these same criteria of objectivity and rational thought are appropriately applied in the area of value judgments. Here we will first discuss some of the essential features of any moral judgment from one of etiquette and personal preference. Finally, we will apply the findings of our discussions to particular topics such as abortion, euthanasia, and homosexuality. Readings include Hugh Curtler, Ethical Argument: Critical Thinking in Ethics and Mark Timmons, Conduct and Character.

HONORS SEMINARS - spring 2015

Investigating Future Patient Profiles
Dr. Sylvia Hutchinson
Student Affairs
CRN:  26621  
Mondays, 2:30-3:20
Memorial Hall  Room 404F 

This seminar will provide opportunities for pre-med students to investigate social and demographic issues which they believe may be a part of medical practice in the future. The seminar participants will use medical case problems, selected books and readings, and current news articles to project and examine social issues which they believe they will meet in the practice of medicine. Issues will be generated from discussions with local physicians and then the seminar students will prioritize the issues they believe merit investigation. 

Emotions, Emotional Intelligence, and the World’s Religions
Dr. Alan Godlas
Religion
CRN:  26658
Wednesdays, 1:25 -2:15
Moore 309 (location may change) 

Although most, if not all, of everything we think and do is influenced by our emotions, they are often ignored in university education, in spite of the fact that recent research in neuroscience and the psychology of intelligence strongly suggests that emotions play an important role in cognition. This “emotional intelligence” (EI), if underdeveloped, can hinder our ability to find and implement wise solutions to the difficult problems we face in our individual lives and in our globalized world. My contention is that, fortunately, the world's religions have rich teachings that can improve EI, even though throughout history such teachings have frequently not been well-utilized (often with tragic consequences). This seminar, after examining the scientific evidence for EI and modern psychological methods of enhancing it, will discuss the importance of emotions in Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, and Buddhism, and will then investigate resources in these religions for enhancing EI.

Jihad: In Medieval and Contemporary Islam
Dr. Kenneth Honerkamp
Religion
CRN: 26642
Wednesdays,  1:25 – 2:15
205 Peabody

Jihad in Mediaeval and Contemporary Islam has a twofold purpose. The first is to provide the student with essential material needed by anyone involved in research in the Islamic World; including a concise introduction to the sacred text of Islam, the Quran and an overview of the life of Muhammad and his heritage. The second goal is to open a window for the student upon the Jihad in Islam as perceived by Muslims themselves with an aim towards increasing our understanding of the ongoing debate that this term and or practice currently entails. It is also hoped that the view through the “window of the Muslim world view” will also provide the student a window from which to view the contemporary political issues of the Muslim World in general and the Middle East in particular. This course also aims at introducing the student to some of the basic scholarly resources for doing research in topics that relate to the Muslim world. In our world today the need often arises for a student to do research in an areas related to the Muslim world, after leaving this course the student should have a good idea of what resources we have available at UGA for this kind of research. 

Critical Thinking and Moral Issues
Dr. Frank Harrison
Philosophy
CRN: 26639
Wednesdays 12:20-1:10pm
Peabody 0105

During the first part of this seminar, we will discuss the nature of objective criteria in thinking critically in logic and the sciences. We will then broaden our discussion to examine how these same criteria of objectivity and rational thought are appropriately applied in the area of value judgments. Here we will first discuss some of the essential features of any moral judgment from one of etiquette and personal preference. Finally, we will apply the findings of our discussions to particular topics such as abortion, euthanasia, and homosexuality. Readings include Hugh Curtler, Ethical Argument: Critical Thinking in Ethics and Mark Timmons, Conduct and Character.

HONORS SEMINARS - spring 2014

Critical Thinking and Moral Issues
Dr. Frank Harrison
Philosophy
Call number: 04-051
Wednesdays, 12:20-1:10pm
Peabody 105S

During the first part of this seminar, we will discuss the nature of objective criteria in thinking critically in logic and the sciences.  We will then broaden our discussion to examine how these same criteria of objectivity and rational thought are appropriately applied in the area of value judgments. Here we will first discuss some of the essential features of any moral judgment from one of etiquette and personal preference. Finally, we will apply the findings of our discussions to particular topics such as abortion, euthanasia, and homosexuality. Readings include are Hugh Curtler, Ethical Argument: Critical Thinking in Ethics and Mark Timmons, Conduct and Character.

The Quran: Sacred Text of Islam
Dr. Kenneth Honerkamp
Religion
Call number: 52-392
Wednesdays, 11:15am-12:05pm
201 Peabody

An in-depth study of the Quran (1) as text: its names, definition and a historical overview of the text, its revelation, compilation and the stages which led to its eventual printed form, from both the traditional Islamic perspective and that of Western scholars; and (2) its major themes from early revelations, including epistemology (what is the source of true knowledge?), ontology (what is the nature of reality?), anthropology (what is the role of human being in this reality?), and psychology (what are the centers of human consciousness?). The purpose of this seminar is to provide students with essential material needed by anyone involved in research in the Islamic world and to open a window upon the "Muslim world view" as perceived by Muslims themselves.

Investigating Future Patient Profiles
Dr. Sylvia Hutchinson
Professor Emerita
Center for Teaching and Learning
Call number:  61-817
Mondays, 2:30-3:20pm
Memorial Hall  Room 404F 

This seminar will provide opportunities for pre-med students to investigate social and demographic issues which they believe may be a part of medical practice in the future. The seminar participants will use medical case problems, selected books and readings, and current news articles to project and examine social issues which they believe they will meet in the practice of medicine. Issues will be generated from discussions with local physicians and then the seminar students will prioritize the issues they believe merit investigation. 

Emotions, Emotional Intelligence, and the World’s Religions
Dr. Alan Godlas
Department of Religion
Call number: 81-818
Wednesdays, 2:30-3:20
pm
Peabody Hall Room 0205C

Although most, if not all, of everything we think and do is influenced by our emotions, they are often ignored in university education, in spite of the fact that recent research in neuroscience and the psychology of intelligence strongly suggests that emotions play an important role in cognition. This “emotional intelligence” (EI), if underdeveloped, can hinder our ability to find and implement wise solutions to the difficult problems we face in our individual lives and in our globalized world. My contention is that, fortunately, the world's religions have rich teachings that can improve EI, even though throughout history such teachings have frequently not been well-utilized (often with tragic consequences). This seminar, after examining the scientific evidence for EI and modern psychological methods of enhancing it, will discuss the importance of emotions in Judaism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, and Buddhism, and will then investigate resources in these religions for enhancing EI.

‘Dating’ and Romance:  Then and (Especially) Now
Dr. Melissa Landers-Potts
Department of Human Development and Family Science
Call number: 61-820
Wednesdays, 11:15am-12:05pm
Dawson Hall Room 208

This Honors seminar will explore the changing nature of ‘dating’ and romance among adolescents and young adults (with a focus on emerging adults ages 18-25).  The course will begin by briefly looking at the evolution of dating and romance among youth in the U.S. over the last 200 years; however, the primary focus will be on current patterns of ‘dating’ and romance.  The role played by technology in influencing these norms will also be examined.  Analysis of academic peer-reviewed journal articles, book excerpts and popular press literature, as well as community and self-examination, discussion and experiential learning will be used to investigate how young Americans interact with each other romantically.

Conversations about Language
Dr. Leslie Gordon  
Romance Languages
Call number: 01-822
Monday 2:30–3:20pm
116 Moore College
This course seeks to introduce the student to broader ways of thinking about language.  How does language shape our sense of self and others?  What are the first lessons we learn about language?  What are appropriate uses of language?  Can one flourish if language is deficient or missing? How can we use linguistic knowledge to serve the community? These questions and many others will be explored this semester through readings, class discussion and short writing assignments. In this course you will be introduced to what it means to be an active learner;  you will be encouraged to reflect on the course topics, relate class content to your own experiences, and formulate new questions to explore.

HONORS SEMINARS - spring 2013

The Quran: Sacred Text of Islam
Dr. Kenneth Honerkamp
Religion
Call number: (14-253)
Wednesdays, 1:25-2:15pm
205C Peabody

An in-depth study of the Quran (1) as text: its names, definition and a historical overview of the text, its revelation, compilation and the stages which led to its eventual printed form, from both the traditional Islamic perspective and that of Western scholars; and (2) its major themes from early revelations, including epistemology (what is the source of true knowledge?), ontology (what is the nature of reality?), anthropology (what is the role of human being in this reality?), and psychology (what are the centers of human consciousness?). The purpose of this seminar is to provide students with essential material needed by anyone involved in research in the Islamic world and to open a window upon the "Muslim world view" as perceived by Muslims themselves.

Critical Thinking and Moral Issues
Dr. Frank Harrison
Philosophy
Call number: (00-623)
Wednesdays, 12:20-1:10pm
Peabody 105S
During the first part of this seminar, we will discuss the nature of objective criteria in thinking critically in logic and the sciences. We will then broaden our discussion to examine how these same criteria of objectivity and rational thought are appropriately applied in the area of value judgments. Here we will first discuss some of the essential features of any moral judgment from one of etiquette and personal preference. Finally, we will apply the findings of our discussions to particular topics such as abortion, euthanasia, and homosexuality. Readings include are Hugh Curtler, Ethical Argument: Critical Thinking in Ethics and Mark Timmons, Conduct and Character.

Investigating Future Patient Profiles
Dr. Sylvia Hutchinson
Professor Emerita
Center for Teaching and Learning
Call number: (00-629) 
Tuesdays, 2:00-3:15pm
CTL Conference Room, Instructional Plaza North
This seminar will provide opportunities for pre-med students to investigate social and demographic issues which they believe may be a part of medical practice in the future. The seminar participants will use medical case problems, selected books and readings, and current news articles to project and examine social issues which they believe they will meet in the practice of medicine. Issues will be generated from discussions with local physicians and then the seminar students will prioritize the issues they believe merit investigation. 

The American Civil War in Visual and Material Culture
Dr. Christopher Lawton
Watson-Brown Postdoctoral Fellow in Southern Studies
History
Call number: (90-631) 
Wednesdays, 2:30-3:20pm
Moore College 309
2013 marks the 150th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation, the battles of Chancellorsville and Gettysburg, and the delivery of Abraham Lincoln's Gettysburg Address. This course will use Civil War-era images and objects to explore these events and others and locate them within the larger and grander narratives of the war. Yet, in learning how to "read" photographs, paintings, prints, furniture, weapons, clothing, and everyday items, we will also search out new and meaningful ways of accessing the very small, very human, and ultimately very important stories at the heart of our most profound national tragedy.  

HONORS SEMINARS - spring 2012

The Hazards of Being Free: David Foster Wallace’s Nonfiction
Call number:  34-870
Wednesdays, 10:10-11:00am
Moore College 002

Best known for his novel Infinite Jest (1996), David Foster Wallace has become one of the most influential and respected American authors of the late twentieth century.  In this seminar, we will read selections from his essay collections A Supposedly Fun Thing I'll Never Do Again (1997) and Consider the Lobster (2005) as well as his now famous  2005 Kenyon College commencement address (“This Is Water”). We will also read some articles about his life & times. In our discussions of these works, we will examine Wallace’s engagement with education, his encounters with regional- and consumer culture, his struggles with depression, and his recognition of the philosophical and intellectual dilemmas that we face in our everyday lives. Students will submit several short writing assignments and produce their own commencement addresses (modeled on Wallace’s) to be shared in class and electronically.

Critical Thinking and Moral Issues
Dr. Frank Harrison
Philosophy
Call # 61-767
Wednesdays, 12:20-1:10pm
Peabody 105S

During the first part of this seminar, we will discuss the nature of objective criteria in thinking critically in logic and the sciences.  We will then broaden our discussion to examine how these same criteria of objectivity and rational thought are appropriately applied in the area of value judgments. Here we will first discuss some of the essential features of any moral judgment from one of etiquette and personal preference. Finally, we will apply the findings of our discussions to particular topics such as abortion, euthanasia, and homosexuality. Readings include are Hugh Curtler, Ethical Argument: Critical Thinking in Ethics and Mark Timmons, Conduct and Character.

Florence and the Florentines: Life in Renaissance Italy
Dr. J. David Puett Biochemistry
Call# 81-768
Tuesdays/Thursdays, 12:30-1:45pm
(course meets for the first half of the semester)
Fred C. Davison Life Sciences Complex B121

The Italian Renaissance is arguably one of the most exciting periods in Western European civilization, with a flourishing of lasting intellectual and artistic achievements. This seminar, based on lectures, discussions, and readings, will provide an overview of the literature, art, architecture, economy, political structure, science, engineering, medicine, and technology emerging and practiced in Florence during the 1300-1600s.

The seminar will meet at 12:30-1:45 pm on Tuesday & Thursday for the first half of the semester (time will be allowed for students to travel to the south campus if one has classes on north campus immediately preceding the seminar).

Investigating Future Patient Profiles
Dr. Sylvia Hutchinson
Professor Emerita
Center for Teaching and Learning
Call# 01-769
Mondays, 2:30-3:20pm
CTL Conference Room, Instructional Plaza North

This seminar will provide opportunities for pre-med students to investigate social and demographic issues which they believe may be a part of medical practice in the future. The seminar participants will use medical case problems, selected books and readings, and current news articles to project and  examine social issues which they believe they will meet in the practice of medicine. Issues will be generated from discussions with local physicians and then the seminar students  will prioritize the issues they believe merit investigation. 

HONORS SEMINARS - fall 2011

The Quran: Sacred Text of Islam
Dr. Kenneth Honerkamp
Religion
Call# 92-461 
Wednesdays, 1:25-2:15pm
205C Peabody

An in-depth study of the Quran (1) as text: its names, definition and a historical overview of the text, its revelation, compilation and the stages which led to its eventual printed form, from both the traditional Islamic perspective and that of Western scholars; and (2) its major themes from early revelations, including epistemology (what is the source of true knowledge?), ontology (what is the nature of reality?), anthropology (what is the role of human being in this reality?), and psychology (what are the centers of human consciousness?). The purpose of this seminar is to provide students with essential material needed by anyone involved in research in the Islamic world, and to open a window upon the “Muslim world view” as perceived by Muslims themselves.

Sustainability, the Campus as a Learning Laboratory
Dr. Laurie Fowler
Ecology
Call# 02-462
Wednesdays, 9:05-9:55am
Room 117, Ecology

Sustainability is one of the defining issue of the 21st century, challenging us to create a quality life for all now and in to the future.  The extent to which we adopt and apply the principles of sustainability may determine the quality of life that our country and all humanity will enjoy in the decades ahead.  UGA has made significant commitments to sustainability in the past year creating a new Office of Sustainability and including sustainability in the UGA Strategic Plan.  This seminar will provide an introduction to various aspects of sustainability including the environmental, economic, and social issues related to sustainability, global climate change, ecological and human health, economics and consumption, and theories of behavior change.  Students will apply knowledge learned to real world problems on the University of Georgia campus and in the surrounding community providing an opportunity to affect real change. 

Intro to Research with Biomedical and Health Sciences Institute
(BHSI 3040)

Dr. John Maurer and Ms. Crystal Phillips
Microbiology
Call# 52-084
Wednesdays, 11:15am-12:05pm
175 Paul D. Coverdell Center

Passionate about science and research in biomedical and health sciences? BHSI (the Biomedical Health Sciences Institute) offers this introduction to research seminar, where participants will meet dynamic faculty researchers, take laboratory tours, and learn about earning academic credit while taking part in scientific discovery and pursuing research through the Biomedical Health Sciences Institute. 15 hours of university credit is the only prerequisite.
*Please contact Linda Buffington (lbuff@uga.edu) for course access.

Intro to Research with Biomedical and Health Sciences Institute
(BHSI 3070)

Dr. John Maurer and Ms. Crystal Phillips
Microbiology
Call# 12-082
Wednesdays, 11:15am-12:05pm
175 Paul D. Coverdell Center

Passionate about science and research in biomedical and health sciences? BHSI (the Biomedical Health Sciences Institute) offers this introduction to research seminar, where participants will meet dynamic faculty researchers, take laboratory tours, and learn about earning academic credit while taking part in scientific discovery and pursuing research through the Biomedical Health Sciences Institute. 15 hours of university credit is the only prerequisite.
*Please contact Linda Buffington (lbuff@uga.edu) for course access.

Intro to Research with the Faculty of Engineering
(ENGG 3070)
Ms. Adrienne Madison
Biological & Agricultural Engineering
Call# 79-784
Mondays, 11:15am-12:05pm
305 Driftmier

Want to learn more about research in science, technology, engineering and math? The Faculty Engineering, a research group creating a learning environment for use-inspired research, is offering a seminar focused on seminar instruction, faculty interaction, and laboratory tours. ENGG 3070 facilitates students learning how and why to pursue research with the dynamic faculty researchers from the Faculty of Engineering.
*Please contact Kristen Brink (kbrink@engr.uga.edu) for course access.

HONORS SEMINARS - SPRING 2011

Sustainability and the Food You Eat
Dr. Wayne Parrott
Crop & Soil Sciences
Call# 42-237
Thursdays, 11am-12:15pm
Miller Plant Sciences 3113

How will today’s population meet their food needs during the next decade? The world’s population will increase by 50% during the lifetime of today's college students. The need to feed this population will place even greater strain on land, water, and petroleum-derived resources. Traditional food production practices are too energy intensive and cause too much environmental degradation to meet future needs, so the search is on for alternative practices. The class will grapple with what it means to be sustainable, while students will elaborate upon topics such as organics, genetic engineering, pesticide use, food safety and other topics related to a sustainable food supply.

Florence and the Florentines: Life in Renaissance Italy
Dr. J. David Puett
Biochemistry
Call# 52-246
Tuesdays/ Thursdays, 12:30pm
(course meets for the first half of the semester)

Fred C. Davison Life Sciences Complex B121

The Italian Renaissance is arguably one of the most exciting periods in Western European civilization, with a flourishing of lasting intellectual and artistic achievements. This seminar, based on lectures, discussions, and readings, will provide an overview of the literature, art, architecture, economy, political structure, science, engineering, medicine, and technology emerging and practiced in Florence during the 1300-1600s.
*The course will meet twice a week (60 min. per class) and will end on February 22.*

Medical Law and Professional Ethics
Dr. John Dayton & Dr. Sylvia Hutchinson
Lifelong Education, Administration & Policy
Call# 82-239
Thursdays, 2:00pm
Center for Teaching and Learning Conference Room, Instructional Plaza North

An introduction to the study of medical law and professional ethics, focusing on the roles of federal and state constitutions, legislation, regulations, judicial decisions, current policy issues, and their impact on professional practice.

Honors Seminars - Fall 2010

Sustainability: The Campus as a Learning Laboratory
Dr. Laurie Fowler
Ecology
Call# 71-289
Wednesdays, 11:15am-12:05pm
Room 117 Ecology Building

Sustainability is one of the defining issue of the 21st century, challenging us to create a quality life for all now and in to the future.  The extent to which we adopt and apply the principles of sustainability may determine the quality of life that our country and all humanity will enjoy in the decades ahead.  UGA has made significant commitments to sustainability in the past year creating a new Office of Sustainability and including sustainability in the UGA Strategic Plan.  This seminar will provide an introduction to various aspects of sustainability including the environmental, economic, and social issues related to sustainability, global climate change, ecological and human health, economics and consumption, and theories of behavior change.  Students will apply knowledge learned to real world problems on the University of Georgia campus and in the surrounding community providing an opportunity to affect real change. 

The Quran: Sacred Text of Islam
Dr. Kenneth Honerkamp
Religion
Call# 51-291
Wednesdays, 1:25-2:15pm
205C Peabody

An in-depth study of the Quran (1) as text: its names, definition and a historical overview of the text, its revelation, compilation and the stages which led to its eventual printed form, from both the traditional Islamic perspective and that of Western scholars; and (2) its major themes from early revelations, including epistemology (what is the source of true knowledge?), ontology (what is the nature of reality?), anthropology (what is the role of human being in this reality?), and psychology (what are the centers of human consciousness?). The purpose of this seminar is to provide students with essential material needed by anyone involved in research in the Islamic world, and to open a window upon the “Muslim world view” as perceived by Muslims themselves.

Investigating Future Patient Profiles
Dr. Sylvia Hutchinson, Professor Emerita
Center for Teaching and Learning
Call# 91-293
Wednesdays, 2:30-3:20pm
CTL Conference Room, Instructional Plaza North

This seminar will provide opportunities for pre-med students to investigate social and demographic issues which they believe may be a part of medical practice in the future. The seminar participants will use medical case problems, selected books and readings, and current news articles to project and  examine social issues which they believe they will meet in the practice of medicine. Issues will be generated from discussions with local physicians and then the seminar students will prioritize the issues they believe merit investigation. 

Latin American Telenovelas: More Than Melodramatic Love Stories
Dr. Carolina Acosta-Alzuru
Grady College of Journalism and Mass Communication
Call# 01-294
Wednesdays, 2:30-4:25pm
239A Journalism Building

* PRE-REQUISITE: SPAN 3010 or equivalent*

This honors seminar will examine Latin American telenovelas  and their insertion in Latin America’s social formation. The connections between culture, media and society will be highlighted as we examine the historical roots of the genre, and analyze telenovelas  as a public forum for the negotiation of social issues and meanings associated with Latin American reality. In addition, the course will underscore how telenovelas implicate and draw their audiences into the process of cultural production, as we look at how a mass-produced genre, conceived  as for-profit entertainment,  has tremendous significance in the everyday life of those who watch it. The seminar will be taught in Spanish and will meet eight times for two-hour periods.

Sprawl and Sustainability from a Multidisciplinary Perspective
Dr. Andrew Carswell Housing and Consumer Economics
Call# 61-748
Wednesdays 4:40pm–5:30pm
102 Moore College

This course will take an interdisciplinary approach to the unsustainable development patterns that have come to be called “sprawl” and the effects on natural resources, the built environment, and the human community. The course will feature guest speakers from areas as diverse as hydrology and banking, architecture and public health, wildlife and law. This course will address sustainable architecture and “green” housing, transportation issues, and agricultural implications of sprawl, “New Urbanism” and growth management, and future development in the state of Georgia.

Honors Seminars - Spring 2010

A Bird’s Eye View of Climate Change
Jeff Hepinstall-Cymerman, Michael Conroy, Robert Cooper (Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources), Marshall Shepherd (Franklin College)
Call# 23-189
Tuesdays and Thursdays, 2:00-3:15pm
January 7th – March 4th
Classroom: TBD

In this seminar, we will explore global climate change, climate change modeling, and ecological effects modeling. We will introduce students to model development using evidence-based research, climate change science, global climate modeling, and regional downscaling of global models. Students will gain hands-on experience with climate change science and global climate models through the Educational Global Climate Model. We will also explore models that predict how potential climate change may affect trees, mammals, and birds in the future. The seminar participants will improve their oral communication skills through participation in discussions each week and by leading a discussion on a topic of their own choosing within the realm of global climate change and ecological effects modeling.

Sherlock Holmes and Victorian Culture
Dr. Kirk Willis
History
Call# 82-302
Wednesdays, 2:30-3:20pm
323 LeConte Hall

Sherlock Holmes is one of the best known and most enduring figures of the Victorian age, and the stories and novels in which he appears are full of fascinating insights into late-nineteenth-century Britain.
Questions of wealth and property, race and gender, and class and Empire all appear in Arthur Conan Doyle's richly imagined world. This class will read a story (10-12pp) or two a week and discuss such themes from a time "when the powers of evil were exalted.

Issues in Education Law
Paul Rollins & Ramsey Bridges
UGA School of Law
Call# 91-925
Wednesdays, 3:30-4:45pm
Hirsch Hall Classroom D (Law School)

This seminar will introduce and explore selected issues in Education Law including student free speech, race and diversity in higher education admissions, the rights of students with disabilities, the legal requirements of educating children with limited English proficiency, and religion in schools.  Other issues may be discussed based on current events and student interests.  Students will learn to read and analyze court decisions and will improve their oral communications skills through class participation and by leading discussion of their selected topic.

Investigating Future Patient Profiles
Dr. Sylvia Hutchinson, Professor Emerita
Center for Teaching and Learning
Call#
Wednesdays, 2:30-3:20pm
CTL Conference Room, Instructional Plaza North

This seminar will provide opportunities for pre-med students to investigate social and demographic issues which they believe may be a part of medical practice in the future. The seminar participants will use medical case problems, selected books and readings, and current news articles to project and  examine social issues which they believe they will meet in the practice of medicine. Issues will be generated from discussions with local physicians and then the seminar students will prioritize the issues they believe merit investigation. 

Sustainability and the Food You Eat
Dr. Wayne Parrott
Crop & Soil Sciences
Call# 21-927
Thursdays, 11:00am-12:15pm
Miller Plant Sciences 3113

How will today’s population meet their food needs during the next decade?  The world's population will increase by 50% during the lifetime of today's college students.  The need to feed this population will place even greater strain on land, water, and petroleum-derived resources.  Traditional food production practices are too energy intensive and cause too much environmental degradation to meet future needs, so the search is on for alternative practices.  The class will grapple with what it means to be sustainable, while students will elaborate upon topics such as organics, genetic engineering, pesticide use, food safety and other topics related to a sustainable food supply.

Fabulous Fungi
Dr. Sarah F. Covert
Associate Dean, Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources
Call# 41-928
Tuesdays, 3:30pm
Forestry Resources 307  

Fungi ARE fabulous - our global ecosystem depends upon them, humans use them to make delicious foods, and they come in many fascinating forms.  BUT, they also are fearsome - they can cause devastating plant disease and mortal human illness.  Despite their numerous important functions, fungi are rarely covered in introductory biology courses.  In this seminar, we will attempt to fill in the gaps by exploring the world of fungi and their impacts on humanity through class discussions, student presentations, assigned readings, field trips, lab activities, and a cooking class.

Critical Thinking and Moral Issues
Dr. Frank Harrison
Philosophy
Call# 61-929
Wednesdays, 12:20-1:10pm
Peabody 205S

During the first part of this seminar, we will discuss the nature of objective criteria in thinking critically in logic and the sciences.  We will then broaden our discussion to examine how these same criteria of objectivity and rational thought are appropriately applied in the area of value judgments. Here we will first discuss some of the essential features of any moral judgment from one of etiquette and personal preference. Finally, we will apply the findings of our discussions to particular topics such as abortion, euthanasia, and homosexuality. Readings include are Hugh Curtler, Ethical Argument: Critical Thinking in Ethics and Mark Timmons, Conduct and Character.

Neurodegenerative Diseases    
Dr. Marcus Fechheimer
Biochemistry & Molecular Biology
Call# 21-930
Tuesdays, 12:30-1:45pm
Room 723

We will focus on the molecular basis of disease as well as technical approaches used to gain new information in this field including animal models, cell culture models, model systems, microscopy, genetics, molecular genetics, and biochemistry.  This course should be especially valuable to: 1) students planning to matriculate to graduate school; 2) students participating in or are interested in undergraduate research; 3) any students who simply want to know where knowledge comes from in science; 4) students interested in the cell and molecular biology of neurodegenerative diseases.

 

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